Posts tagged as:

online book review

The Immaculata: A Mystery, by Brad Fern

by Derwood Hunsdale-Talbot on October 7, 2010




It’s a pretty chilly day in the Maldives before I say something like “I wonder if it would have helped if he had made the book longer?” But what other criticism can you give a 190-page book that manages to include (but is not limited to): a dead mother, a distant father, a computer-hacker love […]

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The 19th Wife, by David Ebershoff

by Derwood Hunsdale-Talbot on October 5, 2010




Polygamy is evidently a hot topic.  There is Big Love, an HBO series about a polygamous family.  TBS has jumped on the bandwagon with Sister Wives.  What does a cable TV-deprived person like myself do?  That’s right, you guessed it – read a book!  David Ebershoff has written a fascinating novel which spans historical and contemporary […]

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The Cold Kiss, by John Rector

by Derwood Hunsdale-Talbot on September 16, 2010




I have heard that short stories are more difficult to write than novels.  The Cold Kiss is close to novella territory, and for good reason:  first-time novelist John Rector knows how to say just enough and no more. Nate (the narrator) and Sara are a young couple who are driving to Reno, low on funds […]

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The Bone People, by Keri Hulme: Not the Greatest Beach Read, But…

by Derwood Hunsdale-Talbot on August 30, 2010




The Bone People was selected as the book in my vacation carry-on for a couple of reasons: The great cover. Sometimes a book can be evaluated by its design, and Penguin Classics is having a heyday with their Penguin Ink series to celebrate their 75th Anniversary. You got me Penguin. You always do. All those […]

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Alias Grace, by Margaret Atwood

by Derwood Hunsdale-Talbot on May 20, 2010




There are a few things I love about Margaret Atwood: 1. The fact that, without her, there would be no The Blind Assassin, or Oryx and Crake, or A Handmaid’s Tale, and that very terrible idea is enough to ensure my long-lasting devotion. 2. How she isn’t confined to one voice, or one time period […]

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